Risk assessment essentials Discussion

Safety and health at work is everyones concern Its good for you Its good for business

Risk assessment essentials

 

 

R i s k a s s e s s m e n t e s s e n t i a l s i B a s i C i n F O R m a t i O n & R i s k a s s e s s m e n t G e n e R a l

B a s i C i n F O R m a t i O n & R i s k a s s e s s m e n t G e n e R a l i R i s k a s s e s s m e n t e s s e n t i a l s

Safety and health at work is everyones concern Its good for you Its good for business

 

 

R i s k a s s e s s m e n t e s s e n t i a l s i B a s i C i n F O R m a t i O n & R i s k a s s e s s m e n t G e n e R a l B a s i C i n F O R m a t i O n & R i s k a s s e s s m e n t G e n e R a l i R i s k a s s e s s m e n t e s s e n t i a l s

Content

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More sector-specific checklists available at: http://hwi.osha.europa.eu

PART III: IDENTIFICATION OF HAZARDS AND SELECTION OF PREVENTIVE MEASURES GENERAL

Checklist No. : Uneven or slippery flat surfaces Checklist No. : Moving vehicles and machines Checklist No. : Moving parts of machines 4 Checklist No. 4: Electrical installations and equipment 5 Checklist No. 5: Fire 6 Checklist No. 6: Explosion 8 Checklist No. 7: Chemical substances 0 Checklist No. 8: Noise Checklist No. 9: Vibration Checklist No. 0: Lighting 4 Checklist No. : Stress at work 6

PART IV: IDENTIFICATION OF HAZARDS AND SELECTION OF PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR SPECIFIC SECTORS AND WORK

Office work 0 Construction Food processing 6 Woodworking 8 Car repair 40 Agriculture 4 Small-scale surface mining 48

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Information: http://hwi.osha.europa.eu

PART I: BASIC INFORMATION What is a hazard? What is a risk? 4 Why/how should I carry out a risk assessment? 4 How can I carry out a risk assessment? 4 How should I use this tool? 5

PART II: RISK ASSESSMENT GENERAL Step : What information should I collect? 6 How can I collect this information? 6 Step : How can I identify hazards? 7 CHECKLIST GENERAL 8 Step : How can I assess risk arising from a hazard? 9 Step 4: How can I plan actions to eliminate or reduce risk

arising from that hazard? 0 Step 5: How should I document my risk assessment? 0

A RISK ASSESSMENT SHEET

 

 

R i s k a s s e s s m e n t e s s e n t i a l s i B a s i C i n F O R m a t i O n & R i s k a s s e s s m e n t G e n e R a l

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THIS TOOL WILL HELP YOU TO GO THROUGH ALL THE STEPS, AND TO C ARRY OUT AND DOCUMENT YOUR RISK ASSESSMENT

How should I use this tool?

H o w s h o u l d I d o c u m e n t m y r i s k a s s e s s m e n t ? G o to

S T E P 5 PA R T II S T E P 5

G o to S T E P 4 PA R T II

S T E P 4

H o w c a n I p l a n a c t i o n s t o e l i m i n a t e o r r e d u c e r i s k a r i s i n g f r o m a h a z a r d ?

H o w c a n I a s s e s s r i s k a r i s i n g f r o m a h a z a r d ? G o to

S T E P 3 PA R T II S T E P 3

H o w c a n I i d e n t i f y h a z a r d s ? G o to

S T E P 2 PA R T II S T E P 2

PA R T I I I

PA R T I V

G o to S T E P 1 PA R T II

S T E P 1

W h a t i n f o r m a t i o n s h o u l d I c o l l e c t ? H o w c a n I c o l l e c t t h i s i n f o r m a t i o n ?

A hazard is anything that has the potential to cause harm.

Hazards can affect people, property, processes;

they can cause accidents and ill-heath, loss of output,

damage to machinery, etc.

Occupational risk refers to the likelihood and the severity

of an injury or an illness occurring as a result of exposure

to a hazard.

What is a hazard? What is a risk?

The main aim of occupational risk assessment is to protect

workers health and safety. Risk assessment helps to

minimise the possibility of the workers or the environment

being harmed due to work-related activities. It also helps

to keep your business competitive and effective.

Under health and safety laws, all employers must carry out

regular risk assessment.

Workplace risk can be assessed in 5 simple steps,

as presented below.

Why/how should I carry out a risk assessment?

How can I carry out a risk assessment?

S T E P 5 D o c u m e n t i n g r i s k a s s e s s m e n t

S T E P 2 I d e n t i f y i n g h a z a r d s

S T E P 3 A s s e s s i n g r i s k a r i s i n g f r o m h a z a r d s ( e s t i m a t i n g p r o b a b i l i t y a n d s e v e r i t y o f c o n s e q u e n c e s a n d d e c i d i n g w h e t h e r r i s k i s t o l e r a b l e )

S T E P 4 P l a n n i n g a c t i o n s t o e l i m i n a t e o r r e d u c e r i s k R e v i e w i n g a s s e s s m e n t

S T E P 1 C o l l e c t i n g i n f o r m a t i o n

PART I: BASIC INfORMATION

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YOUR RISK ASSESSMENT SHOULD BE C ARRIED OUT WITH AN AC TIvE INvOLvEMENT Of ALL THE WORKfORCE.

To identify hazards at the workplace use the GENERAL

CHECKLIST and:

if you know that a hazard exists tick YES

if you know that a hazard does not exist tick NO

if you are not sure if a hazard exists:

use the HAZARD-SPECIFIC CHECKLIST indicated

in column 5

if there is no hazard-specific checklist indicated in column 5

of the GENERAL CHECKLIST, you can look for further

information on the websites of the European Agency

(http://hwi.osha.europa.eu) or national authorities,

or ask your local occupational safety and health advisors

for assistance.

We have also provided some checklists for the following

specific sectors:

office work

construction

car repair

food processing

woodworking

agriculture

small-scale surface mining

If you are involved in one of these activities,

go to the sector-specific checklists in PART IV.

How can I identify hazards?

S T E P 2

To assess occupational risk at the workplace

you need to know:

where the workplace and/or the jobs performed are

located;

who works there: pay particular attention to those for

whom occupational hazard may be more severe than usual,

such as pregnant women, young workers or workers with

disabilities. Remember also about part-time workers,

subcontractors and visitors, and employees who work off-

site (including drivers, those visiting clients or customers

homes, etc.);

what work equipment, materials, and processes are used;

what tasks are performed (e. g., in what way and for how

long they are performed);

what hazards have already been identified, and what their

sources are;

what the potential consequences of existing hazards are;

what protective measures are used;

what accidents, occupational diseases and other

occurrences of ill-health have been reported;

what legal and other requirements are related to the

workplace.

You can look for information

in the following sources:

technical data of the equipment, materials, or substances

used at the workplace;

technological procedures and work manuals;

results of measurements of noxious, or hazardous and

strenuous factors at the workplace;

records of work accidents and occupational diseases;

specifications of the properties of chemical substances;

legal regulations and technical standards;

scientific and technical literature.

Information can also be obtained by:

observing the work environment;

observing the tasks performed at the workplace;

observing the tasks performed outside the workplace;

interviewing employees;

observing external factors that may have an impact on the

workplace (e. g., tasks performed by third parties, weather

conditions).

What information should I collect?

How can I collect this information?

S T E P 1

PART II: RISK ASSESSMENT GENERAL

 

 

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A. For each identified hazard:

Decide if risk is small, medium, or high taking into account the probability and severity of harm which can be caused by a hazard.

Use the table below to make the decision.

Highly improbable: should not materialise during the entire

occupational career of an employee.

Probable: may materialise only a few times during the

occupational career of an employee.

Highly probable: may materialise repeatedly during the

occupational career of an employee.

Moderately harmful: accidents and illnesses not causing

prolonged distress (such as small nicks, eye irritations,

headaches, etc.).

Medium harmful: accidents and illnesses causing

moderate, but prolonged or periodically recurring distress

(such as wounds, simple fractures, second-degree burns on

a limited body surface, dermal allergy, etc.).

Extremely harmful: accidents and illnesses causing grave

and permanent distress and/or death (e. g., amputations,

complex fractures leading to disability, cancer, second- or

third-degree burns on a large body surface, etc.).

B. Decide whether risk arising from a hazard is acceptable or unacceptable.

In general:

high risk is unacceptable,

small and medium risk is acceptable.

If legal requirements are not complied with, risk is not acceptable!

Remember: Your risk assessment should always be carried out with the employees active involvement. When deciding

on the acceptability of risk, bear in mind their input, and take into account gender, age, and also health of the employees

for whom assessment is conducted.

How can I assess risk arising from a hazard?

S T E P 3

Severity of consequences

Probability Moderate harm Medium harm Extreme harm

Highly improbable Small () Small () Medium ()

Probable Small () Medium () High ()

Highly probable Medium () High () High ()

. Uneven or slippery surfaces (which can cause slips, trips, falls, etc.) Part III – . Moving vehicles and machines Part III – . Moving parts of machines Part III – 4. Objects and parts with dangerous surfaces (sharp, rough, etc.) 5. Hot or could surfaces, materials, etc. 6. High workplaces and climbing points (which can cause falls from a height) 7. Hand tools 8. High pressure 9. Electrical installations and equipment Part III – 4 0. Fire Part III – 5 . Explosion Part III – 6 . Chemical substances (including dust) in the air Part III – 7 . Noise Part III – 8 4. Hand-arm vibration Part III – 9 5. Whole-body vibration Part III – 9 6. Lighting Part III – 0 7. UV, IR, laser, and microwave radiation 8. Electromagnetic fields 9. Hot or cold climate 0. Lifting and carrying loads . Work involving poor posture . Biological hazards (viruses, parasites, moulds, bacteria) . Stress, violence, harassment (mobbing) 4. Others: please specify below and tick YES:

No. Hazard YES NO Do not know: go to this hazard- specific checklist:

4 5

Checklist General

 

 

R i s k a s s e s s m e n t e s s e n t i a l s i B a s i C i n F O R m a t i O n & R i s k a s s e s s m e n t G e n e R a l

Signature[s] of people working at the workplace

4 5

Workplace:(nameoftheworkplace) Name of employee:(nameofpersonworkingattheworkplace)

Company name and address

Date:

Risk assessment undertaken by:(namesofpeople)

RI SK

A SS

ES SM

EN T S

HE ET

 

Risk Assessment Sheet

No. HAZARD PREVENTIVE/PROTECTIVE RISK ACTIONS PLANNED MEASURES USED ESTIMATION/EVALUATION TO REDUCE RISK

Card No.:

Signature[s] of people carrying out risk assessment

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If risk is high and assessed as unacceptable, actions

to reduce it need to be taken at once.

If risk is medium and assessed as acceptable, it is

recommended to plan actions to reduce its level.

If risk is small and assessed as acceptable, it is

necessary to ensure that it will remain at the same level.

Preventive and protective measures should be implemented

in the following order of priority:

eliminate hazard/risk,

minimise hazard/risk, through organisational measures,

minimise hazard/risk, through collective protective

measures

reduce risk, through appropriate personal protective

equipment.

To find examples of measures which can be used to reduce

risk, go to hazard-specific checklists in PART III or PART IV.

You can document risk assessment for each workplace

using the RISK ASSESSMENT SHEET below.

 

Record basic information: company name and address,

name of the workplace for which assessment has been

conducted, name(s) of person(s) working at the

workplace, date of the assessment and the name(s)

of person(s) conducting the assessment.

Record identified hazards (for which you have ticked

YES in the GENERAL CHECKLIST) in column of the

RISK ASSESSMENT SHEET.

For each identified hazard:

record preventive/protective measures used to limit risk

arising from a hazard in column ;

record the results of risk assessment

(e. g., high/unacceptable) in column 4;

record actions planned to reduce risk in column 5.

0

How can I plan actions to eliminate or reduce risk arising from that hazard?

How should I document my risk assessment?

S T E P 5S T E P 4

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Checklist No. 01 Checklist No. 02

Ensuring that means of transport are appropriate for the work to be done. Using work equipment with appropriate certificates/licences. Using work equipment according to manufacturers information and manuals. Carrying out regular technical inspection of work equipment. Ensuring that transport routes are appropriately marked and kept tidy. Ensuring that routes are wide enough and that there are no blind spots on them. Ensuring that loads are placed and secured properly. Ensuring that workers are adequately trained. Ensuring that self-propelled means of transport have facilities that prevent unexpected start-up.

ha z ard: MoviNg vehiCles aNd MaChiNes

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

Selecting flooring carefully, especially if it is likely to become wet or dusty due to work processes; keeping surfaces dry. If necessary, treating slippery surfaces chemically; using appropriate cleaning methods. Ensuring regular checking of the floor and traffic routes. Removing holes, cracks, worn carpets, or rugs, etc.; keeping floors and traffic routes clear. Removing thresholds or limiting their height; improving their visibility. Providing workers with suitable footwear. Ensuring that floors and traffic routes are appropriate marked. Ensuring adequate lighting of floors and traffic routes. Positioning equipment so as to avoid cables crossing pedestrian routes; using cable covers to fix them securely to surfaces. Using anti-slippery and easy to clean materials on floors and traffic routes. Ensuring proper flow of liquids from the surface of floors and traffic routes.

1. Do the floors have uneven areas, loose finishes, holes, spills etc.? 2. Are the floors sometimes slippery, e. g., when they are wet due to cleaning,

spilling of liquids (e. g., oil), rain or mud, or dusty due to work processes? 3. Are there thresholds or other changes of level on the floors? 4. Are there trailing cables on the floor? 5. Can workers fall or slip due to unsuitable footwear? 6. Are the floors kept tidy? 7. Are there any obstructions and objects (excluding those which cannot be removed)

left lying around in work areas? 8. Are obstructions that cannot be removed marked? 9. Are all traffic routes appropriately marked? 10. Is the lighting of floors and traffic routes appropriate?

ha z ard: UNeveN or slippery flat sUrfaCes

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

1. Are means of transport ever used in spite of failures and malfunctions? 2. Are the means of transport and work equipment for loading/unloading

(e. g., vehicles, hoists, lifting platforms) ever overloaded? 3. Are transport routes free of obstructions? 4. Is the field of vision on transport routes reduced? 5. Are the means of transport ever used by unauthorised people? 6. Are loads always secured properly? 7. Is the drivers field of vision ever reduced by bulky loads?

part iii: ideNtifiC atioN of ha z ards aNd seleC tioN of preveNtive MeasUres geNeral

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Checklist No. 04

Carrying out a visual check for defects before work starts. Ensuring regular tests carried out by electrical experts. Using only equipment with the EC mark. In the event of equipment damage or defects: switching off the power and pulling out the plug immediately

and reporting the damage. Ensuring that defects are repaired by an electrical expert. Selecting appropriate type of equipment (such as IP protection type, mechanical protection, etc.). Carrying out work according to instructions. De-energising lines. Limiting the work areas of hoisting equipment. Checking electrical equipment before it is used after repairs, and on a regular basis. Using earth wires.

ha zard: eleC triC al iNstallatioNs aNd eqUipMeNt

 

Ensuring that machines are operated by trained and authorised workers. Ensuring that all proper guards are in place and that they work. Using posters and signs to remind workers of the need to use guards. Ensuring that that all necessary guards are in place before starting any machine. Ensuring that areas around machines are clean, tidy, and free of obstructions. Ensuring sufficient space to allow easy movement of workers. Providing appropriate personal protective equipment. Ensuring adequate lighting on machines and around machines. Implementing a clear system of warning information to prevent defective machines being started accidentally. Ensuring that machines are maintained and that defects repaired promptly. Ensuring that there is sufficient space between the moving parts of a machine and fixed parts near the machine.

Checklist No. 03 ha z ard: MoviNg parts of MaChiNes

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

1. Are there any hazardous moving parts in the machines (including auxiliary parts) without safeguards?

2. Do machine safeguards sufficiently prevent workers hands, arms, or other parts of the body from contact with dangerous moving parts?

3. Are all machine guards secured firmly and not easily removable? 4. Can an object fall onto the moving parts of a machine? 5. Do safeguards make the operation of a machine inconvenient or more difficult? 6. Can a machine be oiled without removing the safeguard? 7. Is it possible to remove safeguards without stopping dangerous movements? 8. Are there any unguarded gears, sprockets, pulleys, or flywheels? 9. Are there any exposed belts or chain drives? 10. Are there any exposed set screws, key ways, collars, etc.? 11. Is it easy for an operator to reach ON/OFF controls? 12. Is there one control for more than one operator?

1. Are you sure that safety devices and switches are in place and that they work? 2. Is there any damaged insulation on lines (e. g., kinks or exposed wires)? 3. Is there any damaged electrical equipment housing, or housing not protected

against unauthorised approach? 4. Is there any electrical equipment housing without sign IEC 60417-5036

(a black thunderbolt on a yellow background within a black triangle)? 5. Are there any damaged plugs or sockets? 6. Is it possible to use electrical equipment in an improper way? 7. Is it possible to use damp electrical equipment or to use electrical equipment

with wet hands or in damp clothing? 8. Is it possible to work in dangerous proximity to electrical systems? 9. Are there any live parts near work areas? 10. Are there any exposed conductive parts not connected to the earthing system? 11. Are there any electrostatic charges (such as when refuelling)?

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Checklist No. 05

Appropriate storing of combustible or flammable substances (e. g., not exceeding maximum storage temperatures). Segregating combustible and flammable substances. Preventing or eliminating sources of ignition (including prohibition of smoking). Providing Material Safety Data Sheets for all flammable substances. Cordoning off any danger areas. Making sure that appropriate permissions for work with the use of an open flame are in place. Providing fire extinguishers (to be selected depending on the combustible material and the size of the workplace). Ensuring that electrical equipment is checked regularly. Ensuring appropriate choice of fire-fighting equipment. Checking and servicing fire-fighting equipment regularly. Installing fire alarm equipment. Marking escape and rescue routes, keeping escape and rescue routes clean. Ensuring training for employees. Carrying out emergency drills

add yoUr Notes

ha z ard: fire

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace? Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

1. Are oxidising or flammable substances, such as paint, finishes, adhesives, and solvents used?

2. Are oxidising and flammable substances stored in ventilated rooms? 3. Are Material Safety Data Sheets available for all dangerous chemicals used? 4. Are there any sources of ignition (e. g., open fire, electrical equipment,

electrostatic charges, or high temperature)? 5. Are fire-hazard areas appropriately signed? 6. Are employees who use combustible or flammable substances regularly informed

about the dangerous properties of these chemicals? 7. Is fire-fighting equipment in place and is it suitable? 8. Is fire-fighting equipment serviceable and serviced regularly? 9. Is fire-fighting equipment easily accessible? 10. Are there emergency and escape plans? 11. Are escape routes marked? 12. Are there fire alarms? 13. Are fire-fighting and alarm drills carried out? 14. Is fire-fighting training provided?

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Using ventilation and monitoring concentrations. Providing Material Safety Data Sheets for all explosive chemical substances. Preventing or eliminating sources of ignition. Keeping substances which can form exposable mixtures with air away from open flames,

electrical equipment, sparks, etc. Keeping stored quantities to a minimum. Following instructions not to store certain products together. Avoiding contamination and not putting quantities of a product taken from an original container back into it. Cordoning off any danger explosive areas. Marking any explosive areas. Making sure that appropriate permissions for work with the use of an open flame are in place. Marking escape and rescue routes and keeping them free from obstacles. Training employees. Carrying out emergency drills.

Checklist No. 06 ha z ard: explosioN

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace? Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

1. Are any explosive substance used? 2. Are Material Safety Data Sheets available for all explosive chemicals used? 3. Are explosive chemicals properly labelled? 4. Are explosive mixtures produced in work processes (e. g., air and gases

hydrogen or methane, air and vapour of benzene or acetone, air and wood dust)? 5. Are there any areas where there is a risk of explosion (e. g., rooms in which paints

or solvents, flammable liquids or gases are stored)? 6. Are there any areas where there is a risk of explosion as a result of contamination with flammable

substances, increased storage temperatures, or excessive quanti ties of products being stored? 7. Are gas installations closed and regularly checked? 8. Is the electrical equipment used in explosive areas properly selected? 9. Are there any fire sources in explosive areas? 10. Are there any high temperature sources in explosive areas? 11. Are there any electrostatic fields in explosive areas? 12. Is a ventilation system in place and is it regularly checked? 13. Are explosion-hazard areas marked? 14. Is the concentration of explosive substances in explosive areas continuously monitored? 15. Are monitoring devices regularly checked? 16. Are employees who use explosive substances or preparations regularly informed about the

dangerous properties of these chemicals?

add yoUr Notes

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Substituting very toxic by less toxic substances. Elimination of carcinogenic and mutagenic substances, if possible. Using automated systems for applying hazardous chemical substances. Providing Material Safety Data Sheets for all hazardous chemical substances. Ensuring that all hazardous chemical substances are properly labelled. Ensuring that all hazardous chemical substances are properly handled. Segregating combustible and flammable hazardous chemical substances from one another. Ensuring that the concentrations of hazardous chemical substances are measured and monitored. Installing appropriate collective protection equipment. Ensuring that workers are equipped with personal protective equipment. Providing continuous local exhaust ventilation at all workplaces where the concentration of chemical substances

exceeds Maximum Admissible Concentration (exhaust systems for, e. g., spraying, painting, or coating). Carrying out regular technical checks of the equipment used with chemicals. Inspecting and cleaning exhaust ventilation systems on a regular basis to maintain maximum efficiency. Ensuring regular medical examinations for workers exposed to hazardous chemical substances,

especially to carcinogenic or mutagenic ones. Regular training of workers about risk posed by hazardous chemical substances and safe work with them.

Checklist No. 07 ha z ard: CheMiC al sUbstaNCes

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace? Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

1. Are hazardous chemical substances (classified as very toxic, toxic, harmful, corrosive, irritant, sensitising, carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction, explosive, oxidising, extremely flammable, highly flammable, or flammable) used?

2. Are Material Safety Data Sheets available for all the hazardous chemicals that are used? 3. Are all hazardous chemicals properly labelled? 4. Are all hazardous chemicals properly handled? 5. Are all the workers who use hazardous chemical substances regularly informed about the

dangerous properties of these chemicals? 6. Do young workers or pregnant women have contact with carcinogenic or

mutagenic substances? 7. Do you ensure measurements of the concentration (in workplace air) of substances

for which Maximum Admissible Concentrations have been established? 8. Are the concentrations of chemical substances in workplace air lower than

Maximum Admissible Concentrations? 9. Is collective protective equipment (general ventilation and local ventilation systems)

for all workplaces where chemicals are used provided? 10. Are ventilation systems checked regularly? 11. Is personal protective equipment (gloves, goggles or face shields, respirators)

for workers who use chemicals provided? 12. Are regular medical examinations for workers exposed to hazardous chemical

substances or preparations provided? 13. Are workers exposed to carcinogenic substances under special medical care? 14. Are all the workers trained in the proper way of using and handling hazardous

chemical substances or preparations?

add yoUr Notes

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Checklist No. 09

Determining workers personal exposure to vibration; checking compliance with the limits established by law. Isolating the workplace (seats, floors) from vibration. Avoiding equipment and tools which generate vibration. Reducing time spent working with equipment generating vibration. Using the right tools (equipped with insulated or low-impact hand grips, etc.)

and ensuring that they are properly maintained. Following the instructions for use of equipment and tools. Ensuring appropriate training and information. Providing protective gloves to ensure protection from hand-arm vibration. Ensuring that protective gloves are used and properly maintained. Keeping warm at work, especially warm hands; doing hand exercises. Providing protective clothing necessary to keep workers warm and dry. Ensuring regular medical examinations.

ha z ard: vibratioNChecklist No. 08

Determining workers exposure; checking compliance with the limits established in legal requirements. Introducing engineering controls which can reduce noise emission (e. g., isolating vibrating machinery

or components from their surroundings, fitting air exhausts with silencers). Positioning sources of noise further away from workers. Limiting time spent in noisy areas. Mounting enclosures around machines to reduce noise emission. Introducing barriers or screens to block the direct path of sound. Identifying ear protection zones and marking them with signs showing that hearing protection must be worn. Providing appropriate hearing protection (in consultation with employees or their representatives). Ensuring that hearing protection is used. Ensuring that hearing protection works effectively and is properly maintained. Providing information, instruction, and training. Ensuring regular hearing checks for all workers exposed to high level noise.

ha z ard: Noise

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

1. Can high noise levels arise as a result of work processes (e. g., metal-on-metal impact, engines)?

2. Can high noise levels arise as a result of ambient noise which penetrates buildings? 3. Can operating noise mask alarm signals? 4. Is the noise so loud that you would have to raise your voice to talk to people at your workplace? 5. Do you unintentionally raise your voice when you talk to people after leaving your workplace?

1. Is work done (often or over long periods) in conditions in which clearly perceptible vibrations can be felt when standing or sitting?

2. Is work done (often or over long periods) using hand-held power tools and equipment which can generate vibration?

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Periodic measurements of lighting and lighting uniformity in the task area and the surrounding area at the workplace. Periodic measurements of lighting and lighting uniformity in circulation areas, corridors, stairs, etc. Compliance with the lighting designers maintenance programme, including frequency of lamp replacement,

room cleaning intervals, and cleaning methods. Compliance with the principles of lighting design such as workplace arrangements, type and specifications of

lamps (power, light colour, and colour rendering factor), and surface finishes (reflectance, colour, matt, or glossy). Using additional local or localised lighting at the workplace where high levels of lighting are required. Using more indirect lighting and local lighting to eliminate shadows in the task area. Avoiding glossy surfaces at the workplace (tables, other furniture, etc.). Avoiding the flicker and stroboscopic effect. Periodic use of a checklist or conducting interviews with workers related to problems with lighting.

Checklist No. 10 ha z ard: lightiNg

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace? Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

1. Is lighting at the workplace sufficient to perform tasks efficiently and accurately? 2. Are there visible shadows in the task area which may affect efficiency and accuracy of work? 3. Is the lighting of circulation areas, corridors, stairs, storage rooms, etc., adequate to move

safely and to notice any obstacles (holes in the ground, objects lying on the ground, steps, slippery surfaces or spills, the edge of a platform, etc.)?

4. Can bright sources/surfaces impair workers vision of objects? 5. Are there any complaints from workers related to poor visibility, glare, or unsuitable

lighting at the workplace? 6. Are there excessive contrasts in the field of vision which can result in fatigue

or constant re-adaptation of the eyes? 7. Are there veiling reflections in the work area (direct reflections from polished, shiny,

or glossy surfaces) which alter task visibility? 8. Are there large spatial variations in lighting around the work area which may lead

to visual stress? 9. Are the colours of objects and of skin, in the work environment, rendered naturally

under existing artificial lighting? 10. Are safety colours recognisable under existing artificial lighting? 11. Can workers see the flicker of light? 12. Is rotating machinery perceived as motionless during its normal work under existing

artificial lighting (i. e., there is the stroboscopic effect)?

add yoUr Notes

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Checklist No. 11 ha z ard: stress at work

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace? Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

J o b d e m a n d s Do employees usually or occasionally work under high pressure (fast pace of work, tight deadlines)? Do employees usually or occasionally work long hours? Is the workload usually or occasionally very high? Is there a balance between physical and mental job demands and workers abilities? Is the job monotonous? Are there physical risks (noise, temperature, chemicals, etc.)? Are workers clear about what their duties are? Do workers have conflicting demands? Are workers socially isolated when doing their job? J o b c o n t r o l Do workers have influence over the methods they employ to do their job? Do workers have influence over the content of their work? Do workers have the possibility to plan their work, make their own decisions and take responsibility? Is the job split into so many tasks that workers may have little sense of ownership of the final product? Is the schedule of shifts planned in advance? Is the schedule of shifts planned in consultation with workers? Are working hours inflexible? s o c i a l c l i m at e Is there a poor social climate in the workplace? Is there poor cooperation between different groups of workers (e.g., different departments)? Are there interpersonal conflicts or conflicts among groups of workers? Are work issues and problems between workers and managers left undiscussed? Do workers compete strongly with each other? Does bullying or harassment occur? Is there a risk of violence to workers from members of the public (verbal abuse, threats or physical attacks?)

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

s u p p o r t Do workers have the support of their managers and colleagues? Do workers receive both positive and negative feedback concerning their work? Are workers recognised and awarded for doing their job well? Are new workers provided with appropriate on-the-job training and supervision? Are workers supported when changes are planned, or if there is uncertainty about the future of the enterprise etc., to minimise their worries and confusion?

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

J o b d e m a n d s Ensuring that sufficient resources are available in general and for peak times. Structuring operations to avoid peak workloads or bottlenecks as far as possible. Warning about production plans and peak periods in advance. Monitoring of workload and systematically checking how people manage, physically and psychologically,

when the workload is very high. Keeping overtime to a minimum and agreeing forms of compensation after periods with very high workload. Ensuring that workers are skilled enough to do their job. Ensuring that there is a balance between workers abilities and work demands, and that they are neither

over- or under-loaded. Providing workers with systematic training and support so they can manage to carry out their tasks. Encouraging workers to develop their skills continuously. Spreading the scope of the tasks to increase job variety. Introducing a job or task rotation scheme. Ensuring workplace risks are assessed and prevented. Defining employees roles, functions and responsibilities clearly and distinctly. Organising work in a way that allows employees to work with at least one colleague. Facilitate workers social

interaction inside and outside work, e.g., providing an informal meeting room, organising social events.

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

 

 

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add yoUr Notes

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

J o b c o n t r o l Consulting employees and their representatives about the organisation, content and amount of work. Delegating responsibility and problem solving to employees; trusting workers skills and competencies. Monitoring workers job satisfaction. Increasing a sense of employees ownership of their work, e.g. by stressing the wider point of their job,

making their impact and contribution to the final product or service more visible. Planning and informing workers about the schedule of shifts in advance. Consulting workers on the schedule of shifts, if possible adjusting working time to workers own needs.

Giving them some control over planning their own shifts. Introducing flexible working hours and family-friendly measures.

s o c i a l c l i m at e Developing and implementing conflict resolution measures at a workplace. Convening a meeting and discussing the existing problems among workers. Encourage the workers themselves

to identify the source of the problems and find solutions. Ensuring that groups or teams have the right make-up. Providing training in how to deal with interpersonal conflicts. Ensuring especially that managers are properly

trained and skilled to manage people. Promoting a culture of respect. Ensuring that vulnerable employees (such as young workers) are protected, e.g. by mentoring or supervisors support. Developing and implementing an anti-bullying policy. Designing workspaces in a way which protects workers from violence (e.g. special barriers, monitoring system). Avoiding lone working. Have a policy on how to deal with violence to staff, and have it clearly displayed to members of the public (indicating

that it will not be tolerated, and how the organisation will deal with attacks on staff ). Having an effective communication system so that information about incidents and possible problems with violence

gets passed on. Training workers in what to do if a violent situation occurs (recognising, diffusing, obtaining help, reporting etc.)

s u p p o r t Training managers in giving constructive feedback, praising and supporting their subordinates. Implementing special on-the-job training for new employees; using experienced staff to instruct, supervise

and mentor new staff. Communicating clearly and openly about all planned changes (including redundancies) with staff and their

representatives (before, during and after changes). Giving staff the opportunity to discuss and influence change. Providing redundant workers with special training and professional counselling concerning their future careers.

 

 

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Checklist o ffice work

part iv: ideNtifiCatioN of ha zards aNd seleC tioN of preveNtive MeasUres for speCifiC seC tors aNd work

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace? Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

w o r k p l ac e e n v i r o n m e n t Is there floor covering suitable (without holes or obstacles)? Is microclimate appropriate (temperature, sun radiation, humidity, and airflow, (e. g., according to national regulations, experts, or staff consultation)? Is the size of the room appropriate for the number of employees working in it (e. g., according to national legal regulations)? Does the room have natural lighting? In the case of work with Video Display Units (VDUs), are the windows equipped with shades, parasols, or curtains which can eliminate (or minimise) light falling onto the screen? Do light sources, windows and doors, varnished furniture, or walls cause reflections on computer screens? Does noise disturb attention and verbal communication? Do wires and cables hinder employees in their free movements or pose a danger of tripping? Do employees have sufficient space to alter their posture? Is the building properly cleaned and maintained? Is first aid equipment available and is personnel trained in using it? Are escape routes and emergency exits properly signed and kept clear? v i d e o d i s p l aY u n i t s ( v d u s ) a n d p c s Are the images on VDUs well-defined, clearly formed and of suitable size with suitable line spacing? Are the images on VDUs free from vibration (no blurring or trembling)? Can the user easily adjust the brightness and contrast between the characters and the background? Can the VDUs be moved according to the requirements of the user (turned, tilted, etc.) and fixed in the required positions? Does general and local lighting ensure satisfactory light and contrast between the screen and the background of the VDUs? Is the distance between the eyes and the screen 50 – 80 cm? Is the screen free from reflections that may disturb vision? Is the keyboard separate from the monitor? Is comfortable posture of the trunk, arms, and hands possible? Is the space in front of the keyboard and the mouse sufficient for supporting the users wrists?

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

Are the keyboard and the mouse in the vicinity of each other? Are they at the same level? Is the surface of the keyboard matt to prevent reflections? Can the symbols on the keys be distinguished easily; can people read them well if they are in the correct working posture? w o r k p l ac e e Q u i p m e n t Is the chair stable; does it ensure free movement and a comfortable body posture? Is the height of the chair easily adjustable? Is the height of the back of the chair adjustable? If necessary, is arm support available? If necessary, is foot support available? Can the most frequently used equipment and other objects at the workplace be reached without turning the head and trunk? Does the height of the desk ensure the mobility of the legs (and thighs)? Is the page-holder adjustable; can it be fixed in a position which ensures comfortable readability for the user? s o f t wa r e e r g o n o m i c s Does the software meet the requirements of the task? Can the software be adjusted to a beginners level? Is the software provided with mother-tongue help? Does the software present information in a form adapted to the user? Does the employee have support in the case of problems with the software? w o r k o r g a n i s at i o n In the case of continuous work in front of the screen, is it possible to take suitable breaks or can the employee change the type of work? Is the real length of work in front of the screen shorter than 6 hours per day? Do employees tasks vary? Can employees control the order in which they do their tasks? Do employees feel excessive pressure to meet demanding work targets or deadlines? Does the employer ensure adequate information, training, and consultation prior to establishing, keeping up, or improving workplaces involving the use of computers?

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Checklist Construc tion

w o r k p l ac e e n v i r o n m e n t Carrying out regular risk assessment. Consulting staff on suitable changes to the working environment. Measuring and monitoring parameters of the environment. Involving experts when designing (or refurbishing) workplaces.

v i d e o d i s p l aY s u n i t s ( v d u s ) a n d p c s Ensuring that appropriate equipment is used for each type of work activity. Taking ergonomic aspects into consideration when designing (or refurbishing) workplaces.

w o r k p l ac e e Q u i p m e n t Maintaining equipment regularly. Rearranging work area (ergonomic intervention).

p e r s o n – m ac h i n e i n t e r ac t i o n ( s o f t wa r e e r g o n o m i c s ) Training employees to use software. Applying the results of technical development (software updates and enhancements).

w o r k o r g a n i s at i o n Providing employees with suitable OSH instructions. Continuous evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures. Consulting employees on decisions regarding work organisation. Monitoring the health effects of working hours and time schedules.

h e a lt h h a z a r d s Improving ergonomic functionality of workplace equipment, especially space relations between desk-monitor-chair. Improving lighting, eliminating reflections and glare on VDUs. Systematic medical monitoring of employees health (especially for eyesight and musculoskeletal problems).

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Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace? Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

h e a lt h h a z a r d s Is attention paid to employees complaints of problems with their eyesight? Is employees eyesight systematically monitored (as required by national legislation)? If an ophthalmologists examination reveals that an employees glasses or contact lenses are not suitable for working with VDUs, is the employee provided with glasses necessary for clear vision? If employees complain of musculoskeletal pain (neck, back, shoulders, legs), is an ergonomic evaluation carried out?

Can workers get to their place of work safely? Is the site fenced so that the public cannot get in? Are measures in place to protect members of the public (such as people passing by the site)? Are traffic routes cleaned and lit well? Are vehicles equipped with sirens that beep when they move backwards? Is the site tidy and well laid out? Is the site lit well? Are appropriate safety signs in place (e. g., traffic routes, authorised personnel)? Are workers facilities sufficient (changing rooms, washrooms, etc.)? Are there facilities for the workers to eat their meals (canteen, etc.)? Are there first-aid facilities; is health surveillance ensured? Have workers been instructed and trained on safe manual handling? Is appropriate lifting equipment provided for handling heavy loads? Are existing power lines (buried or overhead) identified? Is there a system of work that deals with live electric lines in place? Are precautions taken to ensure that electrical systems and equipment are maintained and frequently inspected by a competent person? Are scaffolds erected, altered, and dismantled by competent people? Do workers check scaffolding periodically? Do workers use mobile ladders only for light work of short duration and when there is no other choice? Do workers know the safest way to place and to use mobile ladders? Is the width of the work area on the scaffolding always larger than the minimum (60 cm)? Have lifts and hoists been properly installed and checked by competent people? Do employees use appropriate guards or wear safety belts when working at a height? Are measures in place to stop workers and objects from falling? Do all people on the site wear correct protective equipment (e. g., footwear, hard hat)? Are suitable protective measures used to prevent or to reduce exposure to dust (e. g., wood, cement, and silica)? Are suitable protective measures used to prevent or to reduce exposure to noise and vibration?

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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t h e o r g a n i s at i o n p h a s e Modifying the work schedule in order to reduce risk, if the need arises. Organising tasks that involve similar protective actions to be performed simultaneously in order to provide collective

protection measures. Making sure that all employees, including those who do not understand the national language well, are familiar with

the potential risk at the site, the established safety measures, and their responsibilities with respect to health and safety issues.

Providing workers with necessary personal protective equipment (hard hats, gloves, masks, safety shoes). Keeping first-aid material on site.

t h e e x e c u t i o n p h a s e Assigning a health and safety coordinator that has training on health and safety issues. Inspecting daily the condition of the scaffolding, before starting any work at the site. Never de-assembling parts of the scaffolding before the completion of all work. Ensuring that the width of the work area on the scaffolding is not shorter than 60 cm. Never climbing on scaffolding, always use a suitable ladder. Ensuring that mobile ladders are placed with an appropriate slope, with the top of the ladder above the surface onto

which the worker steps. Ensuring that the rungs of the ladder are covered with anti-slippery material, and kept free from obstacles. Never using a single ladder longer than 6 m. When ascending or descending a mobile ladder always facing it and using both hands to hold it. Always placing

the tools in an auxiliary kit worn from the waist, and using lifting equipment for the materials to be used. While working on a mobile ladder never stretching the body sideways. Never working on roofs in adverse weather conditions. Placing guards when working at a height, including roof work. Never walking on surfaces covered with fragile material. Performing a daily check of the main electrical switch of the site, and any live electrical cable or apparatus that is under,

over, or on the site. Never commencing any work before a competent person has performed this check. Keeping toxic and dangerous products, and explosives, under control and well signposted. Keeping the site tidy at all times. Keeping all passages and ladders free of obstacles.

t h e d e s i g n p h a s e o f a p r o J e c t Ensuring that safety and health are integrated into the architectural design. Eliminating risk of falls by providing suitable ladders that will be used with an appropriate slope and will be property

secured against inadvertent movement. Designing and installing access routes to roofs. Ensuring that every lifting appliance and item of lifting gear, including their constituent elements, attachments,

anchorages, and supports are of good design and construction, properly installed and used, maintained in good working order, examined and tested by a competent person according to national regulations and operated by workers who have received appropriate training.

Providing adequate and suitable lighting at every workplace, staircase, and any other place on the construction site where a worker may pass.

Planning and performing demolition activities only under the supervision of a competent person. Organising appropriate disposal of construction waste. Building maintenance or demolition: taking all precautions in the case of work with asbestos. Providing an appropriate number of sanitary and washing facilities, areas for eating and for taking shelter during

an interruption of work due to adverse weather.

Is work equipment and machinery maintained in a safe condition? Do the machines safety devices (i. e., sound signals, guards) work? Is the equipment for the protection of excavations used to minimise the risk of collapse? Are vehicle and plant operators suitably trained? Do all employees get information about potential risk and the established preventive measures in a language and at a level that they understand?

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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w o r k e Q u i p m e n t Ensuring regular and consistent supervision of workers, inspection of manufacturing equipment, and workplaces. Installing suitable guards; ensuring that specific pieces of equipment (mixers, cutting machines, etc.) are equipped

with guards. Using correct personal protective equipment. Providing regular training oriented towards risk specific to this sector. Training workers in the proper use and maintenance of machines and equipment; allowing only trained workers

to operate equipment. Ensuring that workers use specific pieces of equipment in accordance with safe procedures. Maintaining maintenance and cleaning of all pieces of equipment regularly. Ensuring classification of hazardous pieces of equipment. Never cleaning and maintaining machines connected to the power source.

c h e m i c a l a n d b i o lo g i c a l h a z a r d s Using correct personal protective equipment when working with chemicals (gloves, safety glasses, face shields, respirators). Ensuring the proper marking of areas of chemical preparation storage, complying with local working regulations,

including instructions for material handling for storage areas and process equipment. Not entering tanks, cisterns, or reservoirs without the presence of another person. Familiarising workers with the effects of chemicals, with protection against their effects, and providing first aid. Ensuring employees health check-ups in connection with specific requirements of the workplace (medical assessment).

e x p lo s i o n s Assessing the safety of cooling and pressure equipment; inspecting machines and equipment regularly. Paying special attention to the cleaning and maintenance of machines and equipment in dusty air where there is

an explosion risk. a i r Q u a l i t Y

If atmosphere is polluted at the workplace, installing, inspecting, and maintaining a ventilation system. Equipping fans located in the vicinity of machine operators with blade covers. Monitoring the quality of workplace air.

h e a lt h r i s k Keeping all necessary hygienic standards. Providing regular information and training for workers. Providing regular medical examinations for workers. Providing safety breaks and an appropriate work-rest schedule.

Checklist food processing

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

w o r k e Q u i p m e n t Are sharp tools used (cutters, knives, axes, etc.)? Are all machines equipped with guards? Is work performed on a production line (risk of being drawn into it, cutting oneself, amputation, etc.)? Could workers clothing be caught between movable parts of machines causing injury? Are stackers used? Are workers in contact with hot or frozen materials and/or equipment? Are machines cleaned and maintained when connected to the power source? c h e m i c a l a n d b i o lo g i c a l h a z a r d s Is ammonia or another chemical used for cooling? Is entering closed tanks, cisterns, and/or reservoirs necessary (e. g., during inspection, maintenance)? Are workers in direct contact with raw materials and/or materials of animal or plant origin (biol. hazards)? e x p lo s i o n s Is there airborne/settled dust (e. g., flour) in the working environment? Are there pressure devices at the workplace? a i r Q u a l i t Y Are workers exposed to bad smell/odour? Are fans without blade covers used? Are adequate respirators for the protection of workers respiratory system used? h e a lt h r i s k Are workers exposed to a hot and/or a cold environment? Do workers carry loads or work in tiring postures? Do employees work at a monotonous or forced pace? Do employees work night shifts?

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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w o r k e Q u i p m e n t Ensuring that operator and machine are equipped with safety accessories suitable for the hazards of the job. Using equipment according to manufacturers information and manual. Carrying out regular technical checks of equipment. Installing appropriate guards. Training workers on operating and maintaining equipment. Ensuring that woodwork equipment and guards are maintained and regularly cleaned. Allowing only trained and authorised workers to operate and maintain equipment.

e l e c t r i c a l h a z a r d s Grounding all machines, including motor and frame. Regularly checking all electrical installations.

a i r Q u a l i t Y Providing continuous local exhaust ventilation on all woodworking machines and independent exhaust systems for

spraying, painting or coating work. Regular manual cleaning of the workshop. Inspecting and cleaning the exhaust ventilation system on a regular basis to maintain maximum efficiency. Never permitting blow-down of accumulated dust with compressed air.

c h e m i c a l s Substituting solvent-based coatings and adhesives with coatings and adhesives that are less or non-toxic. Using automated systems for applying coatings and adhesives. Training workers in safe work with dangerous chemicals.

n o i s e a n d v i b r at i o n s Reducing noise levels on machines with different measures (source control). Reducing noise levels by isolating, blocking, diverting and absorbing (path control). Using vibration isolators or dumping techniques on equipment. Restricting the number of hours a worker uses a vibrating tool. Allow employees to take 10- to 15-minute breaks from the source of vibration every hour.

h e a lt h r i s k Educating workers regularly about risk at work and about healthy life style. Examining workers periodically with regard to risk to their health at their workplace. Providing safety breaks and an appropriate work-rest schedule.

Checklist woodworking

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

w o r k e Q u i p m e n t Are all machines equipped with guards? Are instructions for safe working practice available? Are workers trained to use the machines? Are inspections and examinations of work equipment conducted regularly? Do workers use push sticks to guide short or narrow pieces of stock through saws? Is it possible for a workers clothing to be caught in moving parts and cause him/her harm? e l e c t r i c a l h a z a r d s Are electrically driven machines grounded? Are all electrical cords, cables and plugs kept in good condition? Are all outlets, junctions, switches and fittings covered? Is equipment with a hazard classification properly rated for the working environment? a i r Q u a l i t Y Is there an at-source exhaust system for woodworking machines, activated automatically when the machines are used? Are exhaust installations checked regularly? Are ceilings, partition walls and cable ducts cleaned and de-dusted? Is the quality of workplace air evaluated? Do workers use a respirator when they work in spray booths? c h e m i c a l s Are all workers who use dangerous chemicals regularly trained? Do workers use personal protective equipment when they use chemicals (gloves, goggles or face shields, respirators)? Are chemicals kept away from fire sources? n o i s e a n d v i b r at i o n s Are noise levels evaluate at the workplace? Do workers exposed to high level of noise use hearing protection? Are vibrations which might transmit from the machine through the work piece to the workers arm avoided? h e a lt h r i s k Are special medical examinations for staff organised? Are workers exposed to high level of noise sent for periodical audiometric tests? Are workers trained in the proper way of lifting and carrying loads? Do you try to meet workers special needs when you arrange their workplace (ergonomics)?

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Maintaining flat surfaces, floor, inspection pit, etc., safe and non-slippery; cleaning work area regularly. Cleaning thoroughly after grinding, painting, etc. Using appropriate material (non-absorbing liquid substances) for flat surfaces. Using correct procedures when pouring oil from a storage barrel and collecting used oil into appropriate barrel;

cleaning oil off the floor. Wearing protective non-slipping shoes. Covering the steps into the inspection pit with non-slipping material. Never stepping on brake tester cylinders. Not staying close to the diagnostic path during a brake test. Never stepping under raised vehicles. Never stepping into a closed inspection pit in a service station. Keeping inspection pits in service station covered after work. Keeping electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic lines out of peoples way. Indicating fixed places for working tools, to be used during work and after work. Marking (e. g., on the floor) ways for cars and transport routes. Ensuring correct control and placement of lifting mechanism arms; not putting hands into moving parts. Ensuring that all activities are performed by well-trained staff; respecting all required safety procedures. Using only recommended safe tools for work with batteries. Ensuring proper ventilation to avoid creation of explosive mixtures of various vapours and liquids. Never smoking

in dangerous areas. Protecting all electrical equipment from humidity, moisture and water. Providing workers with necessary personal protective equipment (gloves, masks, safety shoes). Using effective ventilation and exhaust systems to eliminate hazardous vapours or fumes; where these are not fully

effective, using appropriate personal protective equipment. Installing suitable lighting in the inspection pit. Equipping all work areas with heating/cooling devices to obtain suitable working conditions. Performing regular medical examinations.

Checklist Car repair

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

Are flat surfaces (floor, inspection pit, etc.) regularly cleaned? Are employees obliged to clean the workplace? Are flat surfaces (floor, inspection pit in service station, etc.) paint resistant from substances that are used (e. g., oil, diesel, petrol)? Is the oil used (old and new) collected in appropriate containers? Are the steps to the inspection pit made from non-slipping material? Do workers wear non-slipping shoes? Are there guardrails at free edges of platforms? Are employees told not to step on brake tester cylinders? Are employees told not to step under raised vehicles? Is the inspection pit safely covered after work? Is the inspection pit suitably marked or surrounded with handrails to prevent people from falling down? Do any employees work in narrow areas? Are acoustic and other signals recognisable in narrow work areas (e. g., measuring apparatus)? Is there a fixed place for working tools? Are there marked (e. g., on the floor) ways for cars to enter the service station? Are there safe instructions for entering and leaving cars from the diagnostic path? Are there measures implemented to avoid injuries while working on bodywork (e. g., welding, grinding, painting)? Are there defined safety rules for assembly work (e. g., bodywork, engine)? Are there defined safety rules for work with petrol tanks (e. g., repairing)? Are there defined safe routings or measures to avoid falling parts from a vehicle (e. g., when a car is lifted)? Are there protective guards to eliminate contact of workers with rotating parts (e. g., when balancing a dynamic wheel)? Are measures implemented to avoid workers being caught by rotating parts (e. g., when an engine set up)? Is there a possibility to fix the garage gate to avoid involuntary closing (e. g., due to strong winds while cars are being driven in or out)? Are there organisational and technical measures to avoid fire and heat when, e. g., a car is in a room when paint is drying? Are there instructions to avoid fire in the room in which batteries are stored? Are there measures implemented to avoid explosion when batteries are charged? Are there measures in place to protect electrical equipment from water?

Are suitable protective measure s being used to prevent or reduce exposure to dust and other small parts (e. g., during grinding, welding, painting)? Is the lighting in the inspection pit suitable for performing visual tasks? Is the temperature in the service station suitable for work in during both winter and summer? Is there sufficient ventilation to work in the inspection pit (e. g., welding, grinding)? Do workers have suitable capabilities and skills to perform their work?

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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Checklist agriculture

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

m ac h i n e r Y a n d w o r k e Q u i p m e n t Are workers trained in operating safely the machines and work equipment they use? Are all guards of PTO drive shafts and other guards of machinery and work equipment in place and in good condition? Are there always TWO independent means for keeping raised equipment up when working under it? Are there means for safe changing of tractor wheels available and used? Is the circular saw for woodworking equipped with riving knives and safety appliances like a push stick or a push block? Is welding equipment fitted with all necessary safety means and is it properly maintained? Is suitable personal protective equipment used when working with a chainsaw (e. g., protective trousers, boots, gloves and helmets with visors and ear protectors)? Are instructions for safe working practice available? Is working equipment regularly inspected? t r a n s p o r t a n d m o v i n g m ac h i n e s Are all operators of vehicles, fork-lift trucks or telescopic material handlers formally trained and certified in the safe operation of the machines they use? Are fork lift trucks, telescopic handlers and their attachments regularly examined by a competent institution? Is the farmyard organised for safe movement of vehicles? Are tractor service brakes and hand brakes maintained and checked regularly? Are trailer brakes effective and can they be operated from the tractor seat? Are draw bar rings and pick-up hitch units checked regularly for wear? Are seat belts installed and fastened if a machine might turn over? Are old tractors fitted with a roll bar or a safety cab? Are old cabs or roll bars checked for rust and strength? Are head lights, indicators, brakes and tail lights functioning? Are wing mirrors in place, maintained and kept clean on all self-propelled machines? Is there a safe system of work in place for operations in close proximity to overhead power lines (OHPLs)?

h e i g h t Is there a safe system of work at a height (buildings, machinery, equipment, reservoirs, etc.)? Are all ladders reliable, suitable for heavy work and are they safely stored when not in use? Are precautions taken to ensure ladder stability when using it to work at a height? Have safer alternatives to a ladder for access to heights been considered? Are bale stacks safely positioned, constructed and de-stacked? p e s t i c i d e s Are all pesticides correctly stored? Are all workers who work with pesticides regularly trained? Has risk from pesticides to the health of workers and other people been assessed and have controls been implemented? Is proper personal protective equipment used when working with pesticides? Are pesticides used in a safe way for the environment? c h i l d r e n Are children prevented from gaining access to dangerous places (working activities, a path of moving vehicles, height, liquid storage, dangerous animals, etc.)? Has the risk of children causing fire been minimised? Are children warned about danger? Are requirements for young people who work complied with? a n i m a l s Have proper enclosures for keeping dangerous animals (e. g., bulls, pigs, horses, dogs) been installed? Are enclosures kept in good condition and do they prevent access to animals? Are proper means for animal handling and guidance used when working with animals? Are proper means for animal transportation available and in good condition? b i o lo g i c a l h a z a r d s Are there any sources of hazardous biological agents at your farm (plants, animals and substances of animal origin, organic dust, waste, etc.)? Has the risk of contact with hazardous biological agents been controlled or reduced? Is there a safe system of work with hazardous biological agents?

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n oYES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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a l l h a z a r d s Ensuring information, instruction and training of employees.

m ac h i n e r Y a n d w o r k e Q u i p m e n t Ensuring that machines and work equipment are operated by trained and authorised workers. Ensuring that all guards of PTO drive shafts and other guards of machinery and work equipment are in place and

in good condition. Making stands, blocks, hydraulic jacks, etc., available and easily accessible as an extra means for keeping raised

equipment up. Using special wheel handlers, fork lifts or material handlers for handling large rear tractor wheels. Ensuring that the riving knife of a circular saw is properly installed and that push sticks and push blocks are used. Keeping welding equipment in good condition and using suitable eye protection. Using proper personal protective equipment whenever operating a chainsaw. Carrying out regular inspection and examination of machinery and work equipment

t r a n s p o r t a n d m o v i n g m ac h i n e s Ensuring that vehicles, fork lift trucks or telescopic material handlers are operated by trained, certified and

authorised workers. Introducing a one-way system for transport around the farmyard and a special turning area for vehicles (such as lorries);

separating vehicles from pedestrians. Maintaining service brakes, maintaining and adjusting hand brakes and trailer brakes according to the manufacturers

recommendations. Regular checking for wear and replacing worn draw bar rings and pick-up hitch units. Ensuring that seat belts are fitted and fastened if it is possible that a machine might turn over. Providing safety cabs or roll bars in all tractors, and inspecting them regularly. Inspecting each item of lifting equipment regularly. Ensuring that wing and rear-view mirrors are fitted and in good condition. Ensuring that undamaged, correctly working lights and indicators are fitted in all tractors and trailed equipment and

that they are kept clean. Creating a safe system of work near overhead power lines (OHPLs). Providing a map showing the location and height of OHPLs on the farm.

h e i g h t Eliminating zones with height difference, if possible. Arranging appropriate fencing of dangerous places and keeping them in good condition. Installing warning signs in appropriate places. Using well-maintained ladders; securing them safely against movement.

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace? Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

add yoUr Notes

l i Q u i d s to r ag e Are storage areas properly fenced in? Are fences in good condition? Are proper covers of underground storage and tanks in place and in good condition? Have suitable barriers been installed on loading ramps? Are warning signs in place and in good condition? d r Y s u b s ta n c e s Is there a safe system of working with dry substances (grain, fertilisers, sand, etc.)? Is access to grain storage prevented? b i o g a s Are there any places where biogas can form and accumulate in your farm (slurry storage, enclosed places for animals, waste, wells, etc.)? Is access to such places prevented? Are fire protection measures used? Is there a safe system of work in these dangerous places? w e at h e r Are workers protected from exposure to high temperature, direct sun radiation, low temperature, rain and strong winds?

 

 

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add yoUr Notes

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

Storing ladders safely and out of childrens reach. Using properly designed cage platforms for work at a height, where fork lift trucks or a material handlers are available. Using mobile elevating work platforms, cherry pickers, tower scaffolds or equivalent (grain buckets or potato boxes

should never be used as a work platform). Building stacks and de-stacking in a logical order to ensure a stable structure.

p e s t i c i d e s Eliminating the need to use pesticides. Using products that pose least risk to health. Washing sprayers carefully after use. Doing it far from wells, children and animals. Using correct personal protective equipment. Storing pesticides in proper storage secured against unauthorised access and marked with a clear hazard warning sign.

c h i l d r e n Keeping children away from farming activities and work traffic. Providing a properly fenced play area. Stopping work when unsupervised children appear in the work area and taking them away. Installing warning signs in dangerous places and explaining their meaning to children. Telling children about dangers they should look out for, and about places they are not allowed to go to. Providing information, instruction and training to young people who work and supervising them.

a n i m a l s Feeding animals regularly. Arranging proper enclosures and ensuring their good condition. Installing warning signs in appropriate places. Providing appropriate means for animal handling and guidance, and ensuring proper use of them. Providing appropriate means for animal transportation and keeping them in good condition.

b i o lo g i c a l h a z a r d s Eliminating sources of hazardous biological agents. Keeping the sources away from people. Arranging proper fences around dangerous areas and ensuring their good condition. Installing warning signs in appropriate places. Using disinfection measures. Vaccinating workers. Providing work hygiene measures. Using correct personal protective equipment. Ensuring regular health monitoring.

l i Q u i d s to r ag e Arranging proper fences around storage areas and ensuring their good condition. Ensuring good condition of covers of underground storage and tanks. Ensuring good condition of barriers on ramps. Installing warning signs in appropriate places.

d r Y s u b s ta n c e Arranging measures preventing access to grain storage sites. Installing warning signs in appropriate places. Using light and sound signals to warn bystanders. Keeping unauthorised people away from the workplace.

b i o g a s Eliminating sources of biogas. Preventing or eliminating sources of ignition. Ensuring appropriate ventilation of hazardous areas. Arranging proper fences around hazardous areas and ensuring their good condition. Ensuring fire protection measures. Installing warning signs. Preventing working alone in hazardous areas.

w e at h e r Stopping work when the weather is dangerous. Arranging places with shade and water supply, for getting warm and dry. Limiting time spent outside. Using proper protective clothing.

 

 

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Checklist small-sc ale s ur face Mines

Part A: Does the hazard exist at the workplace?

l a n d s l i d e s Can materials, rock, etc., slide from the slopes in the surface mine? Are there any unmarked, unwatched pits? Are there any unsecured deposits, pit walls or excavations? Is any face, side or bench worked in a way that causes unsupported overhanging or undercutting? Is manual mining of the mineral or the overburden carried out simultaneously on two benches in the surface mine? Do sudden changes of the state of the mine face happen during work? Are vehicle routes to workplaces endangered with, e. g., sliding rock material? Is the face or side wall over 1.5 m high, and not properly supported? wat e r Are there any water hazards in the surface mine? Are there any water reservoirs near the excavations, not connected with the activity of the surface mine? Is the free surface of water checked at least once every 6 months? Is there any possibility that water from a nearby river or pond may find its way to the mine? Are escape routes marked? Are ditches choked? May the amount of the rainfall in one day be higher than the 36-hour-output of the pumps? Is the water inflow from the excavations bigger than the 24-hour-output of the pumps? t r a n s p o r tat i o n w o r k Do workers move along or across the paths of gangway conveyors? Is the inclination of the excavations bigger than 4? Can the bailer of a machine or a loading device move above the drivers cab? Can workers get in the way of vehicles?

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

add yoUr Notes

e x p lo s i v e a n d b l a s t i n g Are any explosives used? Can storage facilities where explosives materials are stored cause danger to other structures in the mine? Do areas surrounding storage facilities for explosive materials contain hazards that could trigger an explosion? Do misfires occur during the blasting? Can an explosive be inserted into choked blast holes? Are any tools which may cause sparking used while charging blast holes? Are there any explosives not being used stored near blast areas? Are there any failures in the system of signalling before blasting? Are detonators and explosives stored or transported together? Does work take place in the area towards which dust and gaseous products from the blast move?

YES if you have ticked at least one answer in a field marked with Please note that the list below does not cover all the possible cases in which there are hazards.

Q u e s t i o n Y e s n o

 

 

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l a n d s l i d e s Fencing the areas of excavations, dumping grounds, mine waste dumps or unstable mining terrains. Marking dangerous sites with warning signs. Ensuring suitable height of scarps and slopes during mining work, depending on the geological conditions and the

properties of the rock. Applying a benching (terraced) system instead of having a steep pit wall. Keeping the slope of loose ground or decomposed rock at an angle (of not more than 45) that ensures stability. Protecting and marking the upper and lower edges of dangerous wall sections. Preventing, at all cost, any face, side or bench from being worked in a way that causes unsupported overhanging

or undercutting. Protecting walls and side walls by means of protective nets. Carrying out scaling from a safe location. If possible, carrying out scaling from the top of the working face downward. Using a scaling bar of suitable length and construction. Constant monitoring of the state of the mine face. Storing the overburden only in designated places, further than 3 m from the working edge. Where the undercutting of a working face is essential, properly installing sufficient means of support

(e. g., sturdy wooden props) to prevent overhanging material from collapsing. wat e r

Disposing unnecessary water reservoirs (if possible). Keeping safety pillars for neighbouring water-courses. Checking regularly the mine drainage system. Determining (by the dispatcher) the way of leaving workplaces in case of a water hazard. As far as possible, arranging mine work so that water is discharged naturally (e. g., into lower abandoned areas). Channelling incoming water down the slopes to collection points to protect the slopes of surface mines. Where necessary,

installing water pumps at such collection points. t r a n s p o r tat i o n w o r k

Choosing and creating safe passages for crew members above conveyors. Equipping conveyors with safety devices protecting excavated material from the falling. Introducing a ban on manual transport on carriages in excavations whose inclination is above 4. Introducing communication and signalling for the workers of transportation squads. Determining in which types of cabins the presence of workers is forbidden during loading. Equipping loading platforms with barriers preventing carriages from rolling down. Introducing obligatory inspection of ropes and mechanisms of the cableway at the beginning of each working shift.

add yoUr Notes

Part B: Examples of preventive measures which can be used to reduce risk

e x p lo s i v e s a n d b l a s t i n g Using non-combustible, fire-resistant and non-sparking materials to build explosive material storage facilities. Electrically grounding explosive material storage facilities when they are made of metal. Placing ventilation holes in the upper and lower part of the building to control dampness and excessive heating. Putting appropriate warning signs that indicate the contents of the storage facilities. Installing correct safety devices preventing unauthorised people from getting inside. Ensuring that detonators are not stored in the same storage area as other explosives, unless they are kept in

a separate compartment. Ensuring that areas surrounding storage facilities for explosive materials are clear of rubbish, bushes, dry grass or trees

within a 10-m radius. Ensuring that there are no other combustible materials (e. g., gasoline; diesel) stored within a 20-m radius

of the magazine. Ensuring that the entrance to the blast area is forbidden for 30 minutes after each blast. Checking if there are any misfires. Checking blast holes for obstructions which should, as far as possible, be cleared. Not pressing forcibly explosives into a blast hole, for any reason. Placing explosives into blast holes only by means non-sparking equipment, such as bamboo-type charging rods. Using fine sand in small paper packets or clay noodles as tamping. Placing unused explosive materials in a protected location, as soon as practicable after charging is completed.

 

 

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add yoUr Notes

R i s k a s s e s s m e n t t O O l i i D e n t i F i C a t i O n O F H a Z a R D s & P R e V e n t i V e m e a s U R e s

 

 

European Agency for Safety and Health at Work Gran Va 33, 48009 Bilbao Spain, tel.: +34 94 479 43 60, fax: +34 94 479 43 83 e-mail: [email protected]

Where to obtain further information

http://hwi.osha.europa.eu

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We have a privacy and confidentiality policy that guides our work. We NEVER share any customer information with third parties. Noone will ever know that you used our assignment help services. It’s only between you and us. We are bound by our policies to protect the customer’s identity and information. All your information, such as your names, phone number, email, order information, and so on, are protected. We have robust security systems that ensure that your data is protected. Hacking our systems is close to impossible, and it has never happened.

How our Assignment  Help Service Works

1.      Place an order

You fill all the paper instructions in the order form. Make sure you include all the helpful materials so that our academic writers can deliver the perfect paper. It will also help to eliminate unnecessary revisions.

2.      Pay for the order

Proceed to pay for the paper so that it can be assigned to one of our expert academic writers. The paper subject is matched with the writer’s area of specialization.

3.      Track the progress

You communicate with the writer and know about the progress of the paper. The client can ask the writer for drafts of the paper. The client can upload extra material and include additional instructions from the lecturer. Receive a paper.

4.      Download the paper

The paper is sent to your email and uploaded to your personal account. You also get a plagiarism report attached to your paper.

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